SAT Writing: Watch Out for Sentence Fragments

February 23, 2009 by  
Filed under All Posts, SAT Unlocked, Writing, Writing Multiple Choice

Complete sentences always contain both a subject and a main verb (or “predicate”).

About two times per test, SAT Writing will include question containing a ‘Sentence Fragment’ – in other words, a sentence that is simply not complete.

Incorrect:
Jesse Owens, the first man to win four gold medals in a single Olympiad, and setting world records in three of four events at the 1936 games in Berlin.

Problem: The sentence is not complete because it lacks a main verb.

Correct:
Jesse Owens, the first man to win four gold medals in a single Olympiad, set world records in three of four events at the 1936 games in Berlin.

40px-face-winksvgTip:
Sentence fragment questions appear almost exclusively on Improving Sentences questions.

From SAT Unlocked, which also includes a complete list of the practice questions in The Official SAT Study Guide that test this SAT Writing rule.

Share

SAT Unlocked II now on sale!

Comments

One Response to “SAT Writing: Watch Out for Sentence Fragments”
  1. Krystal says:

    This is an excellent, short lesson on telling the difference between a fragment and a sentence.

Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!